Kaba – Snow Leopard

Kaba – Snow Leopard

Kaba is a male snow leopard (Panthera uncia), born between 1997 and 1999. His previous facility was shutting down and because he is a senior snow leopard and is completely blind, finding a home was difficult. We are pleased to welcome him to the Foundation and provide him with the love and specialized care he needs. At one point, the differences between snow leopards and other large cats were thought to be significant enough to place them in their own genus Uncia. Besides major differences in ecology, morphology, and behavior, one notable difference is their inability to roar like other...

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Brenda 2 – Snow Leopard

Brenda 2 – Snow Leopard

Brenda 2 is a female snow leopard (Panthera uncia) born in August 2015. Brenda was given to us as a gift to be part of our non-invasive research program comparing how snow leopards adapt to their environments versus other big cats. As an ambassador, she will help educate the public on preservation efforts for her species. At one point, the differences between snow leopards and other large cats were thought to be significant enough to place them in their own genus Uncia. Besides major differences in ecology, morphology, and behavior, one notable difference is their inability to roar like...

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Nebula – Clouded Leopard

Nebula – Clouded Leopard

Nebula is a female clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) born in March 2015. Her namesake comes from the beautiful interstellar clouds of dust and ionized gases. Nebula has come to the Foundation to help us learn more about the behavior, health, nutrition, and soundness of these elusive animals. Clouded leopards are medium-sized cats because they normally weigh only around 40 pounds. In proportion to their body size, this species has the longest canines compared to body size of any living feline, so long that some people have compared them to the extinct saber-toothed tigers. The upper canines...

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Everest – Snow Leopard

Everest – Snow Leopard

Everest is a male snow leopard (Panthera uncia) born in summer 2013. He was brought here to become part of our educational and behavioral research program. A 100% healthy cat, we look forward to providing him with all that he needs to live a quality life. At one point, the differences between snow leopards and other large cats were thought to be significant enough to place them in their own genus- Uncia. Besides major differences in ecology, morphology, and behavior, one notable difference is their inability to roar like other large cats. Although it shares its name with the common leopard...

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Zoey 2 – Asiatic Leopard

Zoey 2 – Asiatic Leopard

Zoey 2 is a female Asiatic leopard (Panthera pardus), born in August 2003. Zoey 2 is the spitting image of her namesake. She thinks she’s twice as tough, and is trying to run the place! She is completely healthy and we are very fortunate to have her. The leopard is the smallest of the five ‘big cats’ of the genus Panthera, with the Asiatic leopard being smaller than its African counterparts. It has relatively short legs and a long body with a large skull. Their fur patterns are often confused with those of cheetahs and jaguars. While leopards have a rosette pattern similar to jaguars, the...

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Rosie – Clouded Leopard

Rosie – Clouded Leopard

Rosie is a female clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) born in July 2011. She is healthy, and was donated to be part of an animal behavior research project. Clouded leopards are medium-sized cats because they normally weigh only around 40 pounds. In proportion to their body size, this species has the longest canines compared to body size of any living feline, so long that some people have compared them to the extinct saber-toothed tigers. The upper canines may measure 4.0 cm or longer. The clouded leopard is named for its distinctive cloud-shaped markings. They are excellent climbers due to...

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Tshuma – African Leopard

Tshuma – African Leopard

Tshuma is a male African leopard (Panthera pardus) born in December 2009. In Swahili, Tshuma means “money maker”. In his youth, he was a budding actor. He appeared on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno, as well as the Chelsea Lately show, and Animal Planet. Tshuma really enjoyed traveling but he has settled into his retirement and has become an ambassador to his species at the Foundation. The leopard is the smallest of the five ‘big cats’ of the genus Panthera, with the Asiatic leopard being smaller than its African counterpart. The African leopard has relatively short legs and a long body with...

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